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#1401 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 15 February 2016 - 01:37 PM

Never Say Die (1939: Elliot Nugent)
 
I like Bob Hope so I am always a bit biased with his films (and I have seen over 30 with him in it).  This is one of several films he did with Martha Raye and it seems interesting now to see her billed over him, though she was quite popular at the time and Bob was newer to feature films, though she is nowhere near as known now as Hope.  So I enjoyed this for the second time.  It’s a playful tale of a hypochondriac millionaire who is in a foreign land trying to get better while at the same time avoiding a black widow (Gale Sondergaard, always good with her mystique, watch her with Hope in The Cat and the Canary which also came out in 1939.)  He gets a wrong diagnosis, thinks he is going to die early from high acidity and wants to find out a better use for his money.  He figures out a plan to marry Martha Raye’s character and give her the money after he dies.  She is avoiding her fiancé (Andy Devine; always fun seeing him in non-westerns.)  Cowritten by future director Preston Sturges who directed several really good comedies like The Palm Beach Story and Unfaithfully Yours.  
 
Why Worry? (1923: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor) Silent
 
Interesting little coincidence here where Harold Lloyd’s character her is also a pill popping hypochondriac in a foreign land.  There is a romance brewing her as well, but with his nurse instead of a complete stranger.  But Lloyd has to survive a coup taking place on the island while he is there.  There are many great silent comedians with nowadays Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin being the most known, but Lloyd who was more popular than Keaton and almost as popular as Chaplin when these were released is ironically somewhat less known today than those two.  I am a fan of both (huge fan of Keaton), but I also enjoy Lloyd’s comedies as well (he may not be the director, but he was in charge).  This one is a short film, came after the success of Safety Last! (seriously watch this; Criterion has a release), but is quite funny and is recommended for fans of comedy.
 
The Unbeliever (1918: Alan Crosland) Silent
 
This is the last film on a Kino DVD set of Edison films.  Edison’s company which was vastly important in the early part of American cinema had fallen in disfavor when feature length films where becoming more important (for a variety of reasons including everything from lack of retention of talent to just not making enough money.)  I have an interest in World War I films and this one has a few intriguing facts about it.  It is surprisingly not as biased (though Erich von Stroheim’s performance was one of pure evil; great to see him young, he would become a bigger star as both a director and actor later on) as one would have it, especially when this was made at the tail end of the war.  I cannot imagine a film during World War II being as non-biased (when Alfred Hitchcock tried in Lifeboat he was criticized for it at the time, even though it too had its biases.)   
 
But one of the reasons I went through this entire set was to learn more about the filmmaking methods of the East Coast factory.  For years the earliest films would keep a theatrical approach to filmmaking (some writers call this a proscenium approach) where the camera is placed in front and there tends to be very little cutting.  Now with this last film there are a lot of cuts (sometimes too much), close-ups and a variety of newer additions to filmmaking that were non-existent a decade previous.  The director is now know mostly as the director behind the early sound film The Jazz Singer (not a complete sound film, nor the first, just the most important which led quickly to the adoption of sound to all the studios; compare this to how slow all color filmmaking was; remember there was color film or use of color since almost the beginning of cinema), but he is a director worth watching.  However, since time is valuable, I would first recommend to watch if you are interested such silent WWI classics as The Big Parade or Wings.  Or even sound WWI films such as Wooden Crosses (several uses of double exposure especially the marching soldiers), All Quiet on the Western Front, The Grand Illusion (which also has Erich von Stroheim) and The Dawn Patrol (the 1938 remake.)


Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

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#1402 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 04:40 PM

Casanova’s Big Night (1954: Norman Z. McLeod)
 
Yet another Bob Hope film I recently rewatched.  Definitely light fare, but good if you like this style of comedy. In some ways this is quite similar with an earlier Hope film in Monsieur Beaucaire.  It is a costume comedy dealing with a scared Bob Hope (when ishe not scared) forced to do an impersonation of a more powerful character.  Here he has to double for Casanova, the great lover and swordsman, played unbilled by Vincent Price.  The plot is pretty trivial, but you get your normal amount of Hope one-liners, in-jokes (a great one with Lon Chaney Jr.), some visual humor and I always find it fun to see Basil Rathbone acting (he is also the narrator; he was quite a good fencer in real-life, though he does a little but not enough here.)  The lead love interest is Joan Fontaine (who is used better with Bing Crosby in The Emperor Waltz.)  The biggest annoyance is I did not find one Bing Crosby joke (one of the biggest ongoing gags in cinema was between Crosby and Hope where they would also plant something about one or another in dozens of films.)


Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews

#1403 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 18 February 2016 - 05:13 PM

Wild Card (2015: Simon West) ***/****
 
Surprisingly (to myself) I enjoyed this.  It is funny because after watching it I choose my score on IMBD and then check out the average rating (lower than I thought) and then go and read the rogerebert review (**½, though if you read it, it really sounds like a *** film) and I am wondering to myself why did I enjoy it more than most.  The film is certainly filled with clichés such as the obvious “paid to get beat up” scene, but the pacing and the acting keep me interested throughout.  But the film and direction does play against some of the stereotypes as well (thank goodness.)  A lot of this I think is Simon West’s influence.*  He is a solid director with Con Air as his most well known.  Like the review stated on rogerebert.com, Jason Statham gets to have a lot of dialog and he is pretty good at it.   It is a character driven film, previously done with Burt Reynolds in Heat, based on the William Goldman novel and it feels like it.  Statham’s character Nick Wild is in the John Wick, Robert McCall (The Equalizer), Donnie Yen (both in character and real life :D) mode.  He’s mostly unstoppable.  The only thing that can stop him is him (or maybe the mob or some sniper though that was not used here).  Corey Yuen’s choreography here is done well even if a bit short, especially the last scene with the cutlery (like the talked about but not seen scene in John Wick with the pencil).  Stanley Tucci plays a mob boss that seems more realistic and is pretty effective similar to Francis Ng’s brilliant performance in Infernal Affairs 2.
 
Notes: the card scenes are done quite well.  Interesting use of cameos.  I was not sold on Dominik García-Lorido’s performance.
 
* There is some interesting use of flash forwards.  There is a lot that is understated and West feels the need not to explain everything.  There is some teasing as to how angles are going to go, but puts them out more logically than some possible expected twists.


Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews

#1404 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 05:14 PM

Girl Shy (1924: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor):
 
For me I pretty much like everything Harold Lloyd did in the 1920s.  This is no exception.  Lloyd portrays a completely shy stutterer who has been working on a manuscript to get women.  His Tao of Steve.  In some of the funnier moments his reverie segments of his successes of various types of females (like flapper or vampire – no not that, a vamp was a Pola Negri or Theda Bara type of “maneater” role – that still does not sound right.) He falls in love with, unknown to him, a rich heiress who loves him as well. Of course it ends with another awesome chase sequence, not quite up there with Speedy, but quite good.  At some point expect this to come out on Criterion as they have the rights to this.  I have the New Line Home Video collection (R1) of Harold Lloyd which is awesome and still relevant since Criterion is so slow on their releases.
 
Operation Petticoat (1959: Blake Edwards)
 
I have been trying to cover a few of the more well-known films dealing with WWII that I have not seen (yes I will see The Desert Rats soon).  I have seen scenes of this, but never all of this.  Directed by a good comedy director in Blake Edwards (love the Pink Panther films, well the Peter Sellers ones) and it is a completely non-serious movie – a war film with I think no casualties – not counting a truck sunk by a submarine or the indignity of the pink paint job.  I am a Cary Grant fan so that made this a must watch for me.  It is kind of funny that Grant was a proponent of LSD at this time and he gave an interview to the New York Herald Tribune which was published during this movie about it.  One scene was peculiar when he flicks his lighter and just stares at it.  I was wondering if he was under the influence at that particular moment. Overall I found it fun with sporadically hilarious scenes.  Tony Curtis’s character got a little annoying as the “I can get you anything” clerk cliché though.  I know it is supposed to be a comedy, similar to later military ones such as Sgt. Bilko (not quite in the realm of Stripes) and Down Periscope (I actually like this one.)  I have this in an Olive R1 which unfortunately does not have subtitles but the print is quite good.


Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews

#1405 masterofoneinchpunch

masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 05:24 PM

She Done Him Wrong (1933: Lowell Sherman) 2nd time watched:
 
For me it is fun seeing Cary Grant in his earlier roles, especially after seeing him several decades later in Operation Petticoat.  You can see his personality starting to bud, he’s not quite as good an actor as he would be later, but he has his transatlantic voice down.  In the early 1930s he was mostly second billed, here to Mae West in his first starring role and only her second time on camera.  West is a legend, one that has been copied, mimicked and referenced countless times over the years and she has only been in 12 films which 8 are in the 1930s.*  She reprises a role she did on stage in Diamond Lil, only it is less raunchy, and full of obvious double entendres where the play was more specific.  But there was not much of a choice as it would not have been shown otherwise (the Hays Code was official adopted a year later, but there was pressure to not do this play; funny enough this movie helped push the cause of the Production Code.)  This film was a hit, was even nominated for a Best Picture Oscar.
 
I find this film more interesting from a historical standpoint, then actually interesting.  The direction is stolid, I am not sure how I actually feel about Mae West (though in some ways she is a precursor to Queen Latifah), Cary Grant is still learning the profession, the plot is so-so (though I do like the 1890s setting) and it suffers from early 1930s cinema problems: the camera is too still and not much of a soundtrack (to see what I mean watch Frankenstein and then Bride of Frankenstein done a few years later to see how soundtracks would be better used for a film).   But this is Mae West’s film and what you think of her will probably determine if you like it or not.  Or you will be historically interested yet recognize the faults of the movie.
 
* Ultimately the reason her career was cut short was that the Hays Code was detrimental to her style of comedy.  Funny enough the book I read earlier: The Films of the Thirties (1982) by Jerry Vermilye had stated that some people thought she was a female impersonator.


Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews

#1406 masterofoneinchpunch

masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 05:36 PM

Arabian Nights (1942: John Rawlins) **½/****: second time seeing this.
 
When you find out that Shemp Howard (in the W.C. Fields film The Bank Dick) plays Sinbad you pretty much know what you are in for.  Arabian Nights is a plebian action film that happens to take place in Middle East (though for some reason mountain ranges can be seen from time to time).   Haroun-Al-Raschid (Jon Hall) is a caliphate who survives an assassination attempt by the help of a surly dancing girl Scheherazade (Maria Montez) and Ali Ben Ali (Sabu).  However, his identity remains unknown to Scheherazade who is prophesied to marry a great leader whom she thinks will be the current caliphate Kamar (Leif Erikson after he came to America) who was responsible for Haroun's injury unbeknownst to her.
 
Scheherazade slowly falls in love with the masquerading prince against her better judgment since he is not a rich powerful man (well she doesn't know whom he really is).  There is a third party who wants access to the throne who is trying to dispose of both the dancing servant and the current Caliphate.  These plot points do keep the movie interesting.
 
This movie is in no way faithful to the Arabian Nights book, though it starts and ends as a tale.  It mixes characters from several stories in a hodge-podge of entertainment: such as having Aladdin always looking for his lamp and rubbing all of them that he sees.  The film is fun with its constant moving of plot and action sequences (though it is hilarious to see scimitars being used like fencing swords), but in most instances it is probably outdated to most current audiences (to be fair the acting in it was not considered well in its own time; the audiences knew this was not sagacious material and was just trying to not think about the current war).   Though it is cool seeing such a large swimming pool in the desert.
 
Arabian Nights was partially created to capitalize on the success of The Thief of Bagdad (As Robert Osbourne would state in the extras on the R1 DVD).  This film would borrow several key elements such as being Universal's first 3-strip Technicolor feature but also borrowing its star Sabu.  However, it missed some of the most important elements.  It is a straightforward film that does not only eschew the magical special effects of its progenitor, but it also fails in its attempt at Arabic mystique or flavor.  It was called a western in the desert and that description is mostly apt.  However, its escapist nature helped make it a hit at the box office and this would be nominated for four Oscars.  It was so popular that ther were several films starring Hall, Montez and Sabu and even more with just Hall and Montez.
 
Fans of the 1940 The Thief of Bagdad might consider watching this for further study of Arabesque attitudes in western theater as well as comparing Sabu's performance (who is also in the Criterion release Black Narcissus).  I would also recommend the earlier 1924 The Thief of Bagdad starring Douglas Fairbanks just because it is awesome.


Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

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#1407 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 09 September 2016 - 03:52 PM

Souls for Sale (1923: Rupert Hughes) Silent
 
There are many reasons we watch movies.  I work off lists and recommendations (of course I do love movies) and I consider myself having a decent knowledge of silent.  I first had heard of this when Roger Ebert* made this one of his Great Movies – a list he was continuously working on until his death to document what he considered great in cinema.  But I have also been working on seeing all of Charlie Chaplin’s appearances in silent where here he is shown directing A Woman of Paris (since he is behind the scenes this is like counting watching 36 Crazy Fists with behind the scenes footage of Jackie Chan; funny enough both of them are smoking).  I thought it was about time to watch another silent, and I had bought the MOD R0 DVD of it.
 
There are many ways to get to Hollywood and appear in moving pictures.  Mem (Eleanor Boardman) marries a Lothario type figure in Owen Scudder (Lew Cody), has second thoughts about it and escapes from him by prematurely leaving the train they are on. ** She wonders around in the desert, lacking water and almost perishing to death (she really did not think this out) until she is saved by a sheik.  Well not really a sheik nor a mirage but an actor (Tom Holby playing a Rudolph Valentino imitation) who is in the middle of the film.  He ends up falling for her, but so does the director (Richard Dix) as well.  She also decides to try to get into pictures as well though her acting skills and especially her comedy would make Dean Shek look like Peter Sellers.  Who will she fall for and will she be a success?  Will here marriage prevent her for falling in love?
 
Worth watching especially if you are a silent movie fan.  There are so many cameos from Chaplin to Eric von Stroheim where he is shown directing Greed (which the studio would cut to pieces) and countless others while having references to filmmaking, other actors and everything that goes along with studio work.  It has some playfulness making fun of selling yourself to try to get a part, the amount of work that one really has to do to be an actor, an oblique reference to the Roscoe Arbuckle scandal and some other satirical bits.  It still has a mostly positive aspect to Hollywood and even with its title it is not cynical.  It has a fast pace and the ending is quite good with a circus on fire, an extraordinarily dangerous fan (which surprisingly would be used like the propeller in Raiders of the Lost Ark just not as bloody.)
 
* Roger Eberts’ review which is worth reading.  I was surprised that he made this one of his great movies.  It is a good film though I would think that several others like Show People (which also has a cameo from Chaplin) or The Big Parade should have made it to his list before this one.  He is correct though in his review, no other major list that I know of has this film on it.  Even a top 300 silent movie list does not have it.
 
** His response is almost a nonchalant “who cares” that the intertitle even makes reference to it (there are some nice sarcastic intertitles here.)  Her foreboding feeling was quite right as it turns out he is a serial killer who takes out insurance on the new wife and then kills them.  I like how the film takes its time with this aspect and when he is apprehended you almost feel like rooting for him to get away – though technically I was not even sure if they had the right person until you see he does not protest his arrest.  Though it is probably one of the more heinous aspects if you think about it to allow him to get away so easily.  Technically the antagonist is a serial killer making me wonder how many older silent films feature that type of character.  Alfred Hitchcock would make a great one in 1927 in The Lodger.


Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

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#1408 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 12:31 PM

This is a rewrite of something I partially wrote several years ago.  I had rewatched both of these the past week as I tend to do every year.
 
Haunted Spooks (1920: Alfred J. Goulding, Hal Roach) ***½/****
The Haunted House (1921: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton) ****/****


I thought I would compare and contrast two famous silent shorts on the same basic theme: the fake haunted house which is itself an offshoot of the old dark house theme.
 
In Haunted Spooks Harold Lloyd plays his typical The Boy character, but with a small twisted twist. After a snubbed love affair he decides to commit suicide (much like Keaton would do in Hard Luck a year later and much like he would do a year later in Never Weaken), which he is completely inept at. Luckily he runs into a lawyer (or the lawyer almost runs into him) who is looking for someone for The Girl (Mildred Davis whom Lloyd would later marry in real life) to marry. He has no issue with this and gives up his current quest for The End sans Burt Reynolds. The Uncle (Wallace Howe) is trying to trick them out of their inheritance. They are supposed to live in the house for at least a year, but if they fail in this her Uncle gets the inheritance. To do this he, from an idea from his wife, creates a haunted house.
 
In The Haunted House we have the more familiar variation of this theme of crooks establishing a haunted house to get away with their nefarious deeds (several Scooby Doo episodes, The Ghost and Mr. Chicken you know you like your Don Knotts). Here we have local crooks led by Keaton-villain Joe Roberts who created an elaborate haunted house to cover up his counterfeiting scheme. Buster Keaton is the bungling bank clerk who happens upon this scheme, but at the same time gets blamed for a robbery at the bank and barely escapes while using the haunted house as a safe house along with criminals and the cast of a Faust flop who are hiding from angry patrons after a disastrous performance.
 
In The Haunted Spooks the house is more of the end of a punchline since its presence is at the end of the short but the house in The Haunted House is one of the best visual gag themed films of its time. It is an elaborate built, well thought out haunted house. Both films are disjointed in storyline, but neither is hurt by this. It seems like a natural progression within the plot both leading up to the haunted house. However, their approach with it is different and that approach is what makes the difference between a good movie versus a great film. So much thought is given into the mechanical gags* of The Haunted House, which is often a modus operandi of Keatons movies since he was a natural tinkerer, that the house itself becomes a character like the brilliant dilapidated mansion in Crimson Peak or in the 1999 version of The Haunting (or is this reference too literal; almost a subgenre as I can think of a whole bunch of other examples.)

However, the most known fact about the film** is that this is the movie where Lloyd lost a thumb, a finger, was blinded for a period of time by a prop bomb that exploded in his face. After this he wore a hand prosthesis for most (probably all) of his work including toward the end of this film.  If you are not looking for it, it is easy to miss his fake hand.  All close-ups later on in the film are done with body hand doubles (reminds me of how James Doohans hands were often doubled in Star Trek close-ups because of a missing finger he lost in WWII or almost any card trick in any movie.)[t]
 
On aspect I noticed for the first time after several years of watching these is that both have at least one excellent scene of moving from foreground to background.  The type of film used flattens out the space so that there really is no need for focus if an object or person changes depth.  So you get to see uses of deep focus which would be made more famous years later in Orson Welless Citizen Kane (occasionally you might read a canard that he was the first to do this which really makes no sense.)
Buster Keaton is one of my favorite comedians, so I am a bit biased. But his popularity had endured because his comedy is brilliant. He is appreciated more by critics now than he ever has during his lifetime and like Chaplin the resurgence started near the 1960s and has not stopped since.  But I am a Harold Lloyd fan as well.  Harold Lloyd to me is the most underrated silent comedian now next to Charley Chase, though Lloyd along with Charles Chaplin was one of the most popular comedians of his era.  It helps that their films are so much easier to get a hold of in the States including several releases from Criterion on both Chaplin and Lloyd while Kino has put out Buster Keatons silent and some rare sound films like the Educational shorts (which for the most part I like and prefer them to the Columbia shorts he would do soon after.) I have the R1 New Line Home Video The Harold Lloyd Comedy Collection which unfortunately is OOP, while Criterion has the rights and are slowly releasing the films and some of the shorts with additional new extras. Funny as I reread this a year later it still holds true: Criterion is slooooooowly releasing the Lloyd films but at least they are available in blu-ray.

Here is an interesting blog entry on the acting differences between the big three while focusing on Harold Lloyd. I found this when searching for the difference between the acting styles of the two. He correct in that Keaton would elongate scenes if the comedy was there where Lloyd is more plot oriented working off of what comes his way. He believes that this is because of Keatons vaudevillian background and Lloyds strictly movie background. While Keaton was the more physical of the two, Lloyd had no issue with doing stunts as well. Lloyd was the outwardly more emotional of the two (this is not saying much since Keaton was known as the stoneface though he did act through the eyes) and often took a more optimistic approach that Keaton.  One thing he is not quite right on is that Keatons deadpan demeanor is not as apparent in the Roscoe Arbuckle shorts.  You can see him cry, laugh and run a whole gamut of emotions.
 
* Love seeing them in Hong Kong films for example the mediocre Fearless Hyena 2
 
** There is some controversy as to how racist Haunted Spooks is. While the portrayal of the blacks is stereotypical in the aspect of them being scared by ghosts, the fact is everyone else besides the Uncle as well. However, the use of intertitles in its characterized drawings of blacks is the most racist aspect about the film and the most difficult to defend.
 
Sources:
Roger Ebert on Safety Last
Roger Ebert on The Films of Buster Keaton
Commentary on Haunted Spooks: Suzanne Lloyd, Annette D'Agostino Lloyd and Richard Correll
Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
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#1409 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 03:43 PM

The Monkey Goes West (1966: Meng Hua Ho: Hong Kong)

The first of four movies in the Journey to the West series. I had seen the third film The Cave of the Silken Web, which I do plan on rewatching, because it came out in a R1 release (and I had no idea there were previous films at the time.) Since I am reading the Journey to the West books (I am on chapter 74 right now) I thought it was a good time to watch this. The book itself is one of the most influential and popular of Chinese literature and is considered one of the four classic novels with Water Margin, Romance of the Three Kingdoms and Dream of the Red Chamber. It has been made and referenced into countless books, cinema and TV.

Reading a book and then watching a movie can be problematic because not only are we dealing with different mediums I find myself being overly nitpicky about the differences between the two. The movie starts around chapter 13 from the book. The book first seven chapters deal with the origins of the Sun Wu-kong (the monkey played by Yueh Hua*, the amount of akas he has in the books are quite large; all the main characters tend to have multiple names.) The rest lead up to the journey itself, which the film starts off with. This is an origin film so you are going to get to see the freeing of the monkey, the meeting up with the other two future disciples Eight Rules (the pig also known as Idiot played by Pang Pang in a memorable performance) and Sandy (aka Sha Monk aka Sha Wu-jing in the book) who really only shows up at the end. The key is the relationship between monkey and the Monk Tang (Tripitaka in the book) and especially the byplay between the monkey and the pig which feels almost like an even more adversarial Abbott and Costello.

The special effects can be cheesy, but they have their own charm. Do not expect a Ray Harryhausen style and quality though. You see an interesting mix of stage scenery and outdoor shooting which was common for Shaws at the time. An overall fun film, the characters, for the most part**, fit their roles well and the adventure begins. With only four films there is no possible way to cover even a decent fraction of what happens in the books. But you do get a feeling of some of the episodes in this movie.

Is anyone familiar with the Peking Opera of this? I am thinking that some of the attire and plot are taken from there instead of the book. This film does at times take on a stage feeling. There are musical interludes, which is not as far off from the books as one might think. The books have a lot of poetry included and often are set (rhythmic patterns) to various tunes like “Moon Over West River.” This feeling is lost to me mostly due to the English reading as opposed to the Mandarin one.

* Some of the filming of this coincided with Come Drink with Me and he had stated in interviews that he and others found himself doing monkey-style movements in the King Hu film.

** And here is where the differences in the book start to permeate my thinking. From the book Eight Rules (piggy) has a much longer snout and would expect a better athlete than here (say a Sammo Hung in his prime could be a perfect fit to the character). The monkey is much shorter normally (four foot tall, though he has the ability to change his height very easily). Sha Monk has a different color face, is much taller than anyone else (I think 10 foot, but cannot re-find the place where this is mentioned) and the elder monk has those long ears that no one then wanted to have :D.


Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
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