Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 9 votes

217 - Tokyo Story


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 February 2009 - 12:51 PM

217.jpg
TOKYO STORY
Yasujiro Ozu

Japan • 1953 • 136 minutes • Black and White • 1.33:1 • Japanese
A profoundly stirring evocation of elemental humanity and universal heartbreak, Tokyo Story is the crowning achievement of the unparalleled Yasujiro Ozu. The film, which follows an aging couple as they leave their rural village to visit their two married children in bustling postwar Tokyo, surveys the rich and complex world of family life with the director’s customary delicacy and incisive perspective on social mores. Featuring lovely performances from Ozu regulars Chishu Ryu and Setsuko Hara, Tokyo Story plumbs and deepens the director’s recurring themes of generational conflict, creating what is without question one of cinema’s mightiest masterpieces.


DISC FEATURES

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Audio commentary featuring Yasujiro Ozu scholar David Desser, editor of Ozu’s “Tokyo Story”
  • I Lived, But . . . , a two-hour documentary from 1953 about Ozu’s life and career, featuring interviews with critics and former cast and crew members
  • Talking with Ozu, a forty-minute tribute to the director from 1993, featuring the reflections of filmmakers Lindsay Anderson, Claire Denis, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Aki Kaurismäki, Stanley Kwan, Paul Schrader, and Wim Wenders
  • Trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by critic David Bordwell


#2 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 February 2009 - 12:52 PM

NOTES:



#3 hal0000

hal0000

    Judge Judy and Executioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 568 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 July 2009 - 08:57 PM

I can't believe I've put off Tokyo Story this long! I'm angry at myself now. My feelings are torn between immense joy for the achievement that Ozu has created and the existential angst that haunts the corners of my mind. Emphasizing the range of emotions that Ozu taps into almost seems superfluous, yet his vision of life is so complete that I don't feel like it's even a movie anymore but a manifestation of life itself. The images on screen are no longer shadows, but real people in my mind. I don't believe I've been this moved by a motion picture since It's a Wonderful Life.

Tokyo Story is an act of human observation, and almost feels like neorealism; there's no need to create scenarios or charge the screen with melodrama. The screen is charged with emotion, there's no doubt about that, but where Tokyo Story excels at this is how close it is to reality. I can see people of all age groups being affected because the picture is so complete in its representation of the family. The children are defiant and don't want to spend time with their grandparents. This is something everyone feels at some point in their lives. It's not admirable, it's inexplicable, yet we've all done it. Later in life, there will always be that regret. Then there's young Kyoko, who struggles with why children drift away from their parents; vowing that she'll always be there but uncertain in the immense face of life.

Perhaps the most regretful situation belongs to those children who have families of their own. What value do we place on our family, and how do we express our love? Regrettably, there is the excuse of money, spas, trinkets, and more generally, material possessions, which we know are empty gestures by themselves, yet most of us have fallen back on these perfunctory displays of affection. It makes me want to tear my teeth out. Family is something that people believe ought to be the most important thing, but do our actions betray our beliefs? That's a tough question that I ask after seeing Tokyo Story, and I don't think there's an answer.

Ozu's famous camera... I am so stunned to have experienced it. His shots are so refreshing after seeing so many pans, zooms, and dolleys. I wonder if Billy Wilder was onto something about "fancy-schmancy" shots, and the camera here is even more pared down.

What does the style invoke? For me, it brings a connection to reality. Ozu is telling me with his camera that these dramas need not be sought out actively. Rather, the camera can be placed anywhere in the household, and the emotion and human dilemma will unfold with stunning clarity.

This film... it's a hug, a kiss, and a slap in the face. It fills me with such a mix of emotion I can't really express them in words. It makes me want to stop watching movies, since life is so precious, what value can the cinema have by comparison? It makes me want to seek out more Ozu, for his camera is so observant. It makes me want to bite my tongue off, for it presents us with no answer for life; even though we know there is none, the false sense of hope we receive from lesser movies becomes a pacifier we yearn for like an infant.

#4 masterofoneinchpunch

masterofoneinchpunch

    The Artful Dodger

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,359 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Modesto, CA
  • Interests:NBA, MMA, Movies, Setting fires.

Posted 16 July 2009 - 10:38 AM

...Ozu's famous camera... I am so stunned to have experienced it. His shots are so refreshing after seeing so many pans, zooms, and dolleys. I wonder if Billy Wilder was onto something about "fancy-schmancy" shots, and the camera here is even more pared down.

What does the style invoke? For me, it brings a connection to reality. Ozu is telling me with his camera that these dramas need not be sought out actively. Rather, the camera can be placed anywhere in the household, and the emotion and human dilemma will unfold with stunning clarity.
...


Actually the camera cannot be placed anywhere. Ozu would spend awhile find the perfect location to place the camera so the "action" would unfurl within the frame. He would not place it above (or below) a certain height

When he does make a camera movement it is even more noticed and pushes more meaning like in Early Spring (Donald Richie states that this is the last traveling shot for Ozu)

Here is David Bordwell on this idea: http://www.filmrefer...u-Yasujiro.html (this is a great read):

Ozu limited his use of certain technical variables, such as camera movement and variety of camera position. This can seem a willful asceticism, but it is perhaps best considered a ground-clearing that let him concentrate on exploring minute stylistic possibilities. For instance, it is commonly claimed that every Ozu shot places the camera about three feet off the ground, but this is false. What Ozu keeps constant is the perceived ratio of camera height to the subject. This permits a narrow but nuanced range of camera positions, making every subject occupy the same sector of each shot. Similarly, most of Ozu's films employ camera movements, but these are also systematized to a rare degree. Far from being an ascetic director, Ozu was quite virtuosic, but within self-imposed limits. His style revealed vast possibilities within a narrow compass.

Ozu's compositions relied on the fixed camera-subject relation, adopting angles that stand at multiples of 45 degrees. He employed sharp perspectival depth; the view down a corridor or street is common. Ozu enjoyed playing with the positions of objects within the frame, often rearranging props from shot to shot for the sake of minute shifts. In the color films, a shot will be enhanced by a fleck of bright and deep color, often red; this accent will migrate around the film, returning as an abstract motif in scene after scene.


Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews

#5 hal0000

hal0000

    Judge Judy and Executioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 568 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 16 July 2009 - 11:03 AM

Actually the camera cannot be placed anywhere. Ozu would spend awhile find the perfect location to place the camera so the "action" would unfurl within the frame. He would not place it above (or below) a certain height


Not exactly what I meant, which is what I get for playing fast and loose with "anywhere."

What I meant was not so much literally anywhere, but more the idea that any observation in everyday life is worth recording, and that the camera need not seek out these images. Often times, you'll get zooms and pans to indicate some sort of revelation, but the passive camera in Tokyo Story feels more natural (i.e., Zooms are expressionistic, rather than realistic). It gives the impression that one is in the room, as an active participant inside the frame (intriguingly, kinda like Playtime).

Part of this comes from what I believe is a connection to neorealism, and Zavattini's writings thereof. He says something along the lines that situations need not be invented fantasies and that simply observing an everyday occurrence is enough. Ozu is emulating this idea by having his camera be as natural as possible. In this sense, any household room becomes a stage for insight. Do some angles have a more appealing aesthetic than others? You bet, but I felt that aside from setting angles and heights, Ozu could use any domestic room he wished to convey an emotional situation.

Don't know if that makes sense or not, and I really shouldn't be acting like I know anything about Ozu from one picture.

#6 masterofoneinchpunch

masterofoneinchpunch

    The Artful Dodger

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,359 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Modesto, CA
  • Interests:NBA, MMA, Movies, Setting fires.

Posted 16 July 2009 - 12:24 PM

His camerawork is actually not very natural. When it is set on the ground (his famous "tatami shot") it is actually lower than a normal person's viewing aspect while sitting or kneeling down (this is another mistake many people make and you can see him set this shot in a few documentaries about 1.5 Feet above ground). Also from David Bordwell:

"In opposition to the 180-degree space of Hollywood cinema, Ozu employed a 360-degree approach to filming a scene. This "circular" shooting space yields a series of what Western cinema would consider incorrect matches of action and eyelines."

It is usually a mistake (I know there are tons of articles that state this, without good reason though) to think of the later Ozu's as neo-realism.

The aesthetics of the camera work is quite strict for Ozu and eschews the documentary style found in neorealism.
Ozu favored a set of professional actors.
Ozu hated locations. He prefered sets. He wanted exact control over everything from the design to the acting. He used lighting, had strict editing and his method was the antithesis of much that we know as neo-realism.
Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews

#7 hal0000

hal0000

    Judge Judy and Executioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 568 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 16 July 2009 - 01:01 PM

If I am sitting in a room with people, I do not see them in the 180 degree system. In this sense, the 180 degree system is less "natural" in regards to emulating our own experiences because it jumps between perspectives. The shooting style in Tokyo Story seems closer to reality, doesn't it? Ozu's camera work is "unnatural" in regards to conventional cinema, but that does not mean that the "over-the-shoulder" technique is closer to the real world. The 180 degree system is more subjective, no?

In thinking about which style feels more objective (Ozu's 360 or the 180 system), I would say Ozu's is.

In regards to neorealism, I'm not talking about technique so much as narrative. The situations in Tokyo Story are nothing out of the ordinary and could be mundane if they weren't so emotionally identifiable. For me, the naturalness of the camera comes from its unwillingness to embellish or dramatize these situations. His camera has been pared down to its most basic function: to observe.

#8 masterofoneinchpunch

masterofoneinchpunch

    The Artful Dodger

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,359 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Modesto, CA
  • Interests:NBA, MMA, Movies, Setting fires.

Posted 16 July 2009 - 01:26 PM

We also do not shift characters while we converse either. :rolleyes: Hence it is also not natural.

When you bandy about a term like neorealism there is a lot of baggage that goes with it. I would probably use a term like realist or realism instead when talking about the mundane aspects of Ozu and the plot of his characters -- even though that would not quite suffice because Ozu's world is a much more transcendental one (yes thinking of Paul Schrader :D). His characters rarely go beyond a certain temperament (imagine a Toshiro Mifune in his picture) or subject matter (why the political aspects of neorealism are not realized in an Ozu movie).

This also has me thinking of how natural stillness is...
Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews

#9 hal0000

hal0000

    Judge Judy and Executioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 568 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 16 July 2009 - 01:46 PM

When you bandy about a term like neorealism there is a lot of baggage that goes with it.
...
His characters rarely go beyond a certain temperament (imagine a Toshiro Mifune in his picture) or subject matter (why the political aspects of neorealism are not realized in an Ozu movie).
...
This also has me thinking of how natural stillness is...


Yeah, neorealism's going a bit far and I should have stopped at "realism." :rolleyes:

I'm amazed at how understated the characters are in Tokyo Story. This is something I find very true to life... what we say does not reveal what we feel as much as how we say it.

My grandparents and my dad speak a dialect called "Fukien" (sp?) and there's a term that sounds like "ah-nah." We use it to describe our feelings of not wanting to impose or be a bother. I don't know if this is exclusively an Asian thing, but Ozu nails this. I find whenever I'm visiting family, there is always that desire to be formally polite (on my Chinese side; the Filipino side's a bit less formal) and if we're frustrated, we hide that.

It's interesting how Asian culture tends to be so family centered, yet the dilemma in Tokyo Story almost feels American. Is this a post-war thing or am I just imagining it? I mean, the son is studying english, and wasn't there Coca-Cola somewhere in there? Or am I remembering this wrong (dang, already returned it).

Hmm... is stillness natural? I would say it is to some extent. By having an unmoving camera, the frame becomes like the walls, floor, and ceiling of a room. It becomes part of the set, for me.

#10 masterofoneinchpunch

masterofoneinchpunch

    The Artful Dodger

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,359 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Modesto, CA
  • Interests:NBA, MMA, Movies, Setting fires.

Posted 16 July 2009 - 03:18 PM

...My grandparents and my dad speak a dialect called "Fukien" (sp?) and there's a term that sounds like "ah-nah." We use it to describe our feelings of not wanting to impose or be a bother. I don't know if this is exclusively an Asian thing, but Ozu nails this. I find whenever I'm visiting family, there is always that desire to be formally polite (on my Chinese side; the Filipino side's a bit less formal) and if we're frustrated, we hide that.

It's interesting how Asian culture tends to be so family centered, yet the dilemma in Tokyo Story almost feels American. Is this a post-war thing or am I just imagining it? I mean, the son is studying english, and wasn't there Coca-Cola somewhere in there? Or am I remembering this wrong (dang, already returned it).

Hmm... is stillness natural? I would say it is to some extent. By having an unmoving camera, the frame becomes like the walls, floor, and ceiling of a room. It becomes part of the set, for me.


I'm always wary about generalizing with the "Asian" term since it incorporates so many vastly different cultures though I do see much of that [not wanting to impose] in several cultures (for example I have seen than with as you say Chinese side with parts of my own family as well as parts of my girlfriends family) and I do not see it in several others as well (Khmer friends and other side of girlfriends family :rolleyes:).

One complaint that I have about many critics (and writers) who have stated that Ozu is the most Japanese of filmmakers (this is parroting that many writers do without actually thinking about what it means). I feel he is the most humanist. Films like Tokyo Story, Early Spring, Late Spring translate so well across cultural bounds (well for the people who have patience :D). So much of the situations/themes in his films are universal from flatulation (Good Morning especially :() to filial matters (this one) to love (most of his work).

I've seen Coca-Cola in Late Spring (also mentioned in this post;). When I rewatch Tokyo Story (the first movie I saw from Ozu and I've now watched all of the R1 Ozu's) I will look for it and get a snapshot if possible.

Which will be the next Ozu for you Hal?
Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews

#11 hal0000

hal0000

    Judge Judy and Executioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 568 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 July 2009 - 12:58 PM

[quote name='masterofoneinchpunch' post='9209' date='Jul 16 2009, 03:18 PM']Which will be the next Ozu for you Hal?[/quote]

No idea. With netflix, I have a pretty large queue, and on a whim, I will bump something up without any serious thought (for some reason, Beauty and the Beast (the Cocteau one) is at home in my mailbox).

I suppose canonically, I would go with Floating Weeds. Any one would do, really. I don't really think there's a certain way we should approach an oeuvre. Maybe An Autumn Afternoon, because it's his last and why not?
----------------------------------------------------
I've been trying to figure out where I've heard this line before and it's bugging the hell out of me:

^_^+-->
QUOTE (unknownspeakerwhoIcan'tforthelifeofmeremember :blink:)
I'm comfortable with strangers; being with relatives is difficult[/quote]

I can't remember if that's the exact way it goes, but I think I heard it recently in a movie somewhere or read it in a book. Regardless, I thought of it all of a sudden and it seems to fit with Noriko in Tokyo Story, doesn't it? Granted, Noriko is not a stranger per se, but she isn't related by blood. I've found this true to life: even though we ought to be comfortable and open with family, our formalities and desires to be pleasant around them can interfere with that. The scenes between the grandparents and their children seem awkward. Both parties avoid offense at all costs it seems, and this desire to be polite, ironically, breeds dishonesty (or maybe discourages openess is a better way of putting it?).

The scenes with Noriko seem less formally guarded, and more exposed. There is still the same level of politeness, but the parents are so frank with her: she ought to remarry, and not hold herself to obligations to her dead husband and be a widow the rest of her life. Jeez, I'm getting emotional just thinking about it. It's so honest, truthful, and compassionate.

#12 masterofoneinchpunch

masterofoneinchpunch

    The Artful Dodger

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,359 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Modesto, CA
  • Interests:NBA, MMA, Movies, Setting fires.

Posted 22 July 2009 - 01:08 PM

...I suppose canonically, I would go with Floating Weeds. Any one would do, really. I don't really think there's a certain way we should approach an oeuvre. Maybe An Autumn Afternoon, because it's his last and why not?
...: she ought to remarry, and not hold herself to obligations to her dead husband and be a widow the rest of her life. ...


There are better approaches to different director's oeuvre than others. Some work fine with a haphazard approach, some do a bit better with a chronological viewing (since Ozu has many films missing and even more not available on DVD this is impossible). I'll think about the best approach for Ozu during lunch ^_^ though I think if you do not have please get the two Eclipse Ozu sets (the Late Ozu is one of the best sets out of Eclipse).

The last paragraph you wrote please keep in mind for the other Ozus you watch. Without telling too much that is an important theme and with different results depending on which film you view.
Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users