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Pasolini, Pier Paolo


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#1 Opale

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 05:29 PM

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Pier Paolo Pasolini
Pier Paolo Pasolini was an Italian poet, intellectual, film director, and writer. Pasolini distinguished himself as a journalist, philosopher, linguist, novelist, playwright, filmmaker, newspaper and magazine columnist, actor, painter and political figure. He demonstrated a unique and extraordinary cultural versatility, in the process becoming a highly controversial figure.

Recommended Films:
The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964)

#2 helloemigoodbye

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 05:36 PM

Pasolini made a movie called Medea?

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I've only seen Salo and Oedipus Rex. Oedipus Rex I thought was awful. Salo was....Salo.
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#3 Opale

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 05:42 PM

Pasolini made a movie called Medea?

Yeah its quite good but just a bit too long IMHO... Its also the only Maria Callas film, its surprising she didn't make more, she was beautiful!

#4 bobham80

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 07:22 PM

The Gospel According to St. Matthew is hands down my favorite Pasolini film and my favorite film depicting The Life of Jesus Chirst.

#5 mikesncc1701

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 09:55 PM

I still think my favorite film of his The Hawkes and The Sparrows. It's really an unusual film for him. It's extremely lighthearted and humorous. An amazing piece and an easy recommendation for anyone.

#6 diceman89

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 02:42 PM

I rather enjoyed Salo, but I didn't much care for The Gospel According to St. Matthew. It was okay, but really wasn't anything special. I have Accatone, but have not gotten around to watching it yet.

When is the Criterion supposed to release the Trilogy of Life? I'm really looking forward to seeing it. I've had chances to watch Decameron, but I decided I would just wait until I could get all three.

#7 Opale

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 02:56 PM

When is the Criterion supposed to release the Trilogy of Life? I'm really looking forward to seeing it. I've had chances to watch Decameron, but I decided I would just wait until I could get all three.

It should be released soon.. Bfi editions are coming in april if I correctly remember...

So far my favorite Pasolini is porcile but I can't wait to see Theorem...

#8 Ian

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 10:11 PM

My favorite Pasolini is The Canterbury Tales. I hope the Criterion uses the proper english language dub rather than the inferior italian one. While the trilogy of life is nowhere as shocking as Salo, the giant dong scene in Canterbury Tales and the hell sequence in Arabian Nights were enough to make me gasp as a teenager seeing these on TV. Trilogy of Life is one of my more anticpated future releases from Criterion. I have not seen the Decameron, which I am looking forward to viewing.

#9 Godard Fan 39

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 09:16 PM

Pasolini's one of my favorite directors, but not because of his films' occasionally lurid content. Teorema is an extremely strange movie. It has under 1000 words total in it from what I've read. When it ended, I burst out laughing. I couldn't believe what I'd just seen. It's quite a movie, though. I've liked almost all his movies. The only ones I didn't care much for are Accatone and The Canterbury Tales. The Decameron, Arabian Nights, The Gospel According to St. Matthew are all fantastic. Gospel has one of the best and most eclectic soundtracks I've ever heard. Arabian Nights'...I'm getting kicked off the computer.
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#10 Pair

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 11:57 AM

[...]The Gospel According to St. Matthew are all fantastic. Gospel has one of the best and most eclectic soundtracks I've ever heard.

Agreed.

I recently saw that Gospel According to St Matthew was playing on TBN! Is it just me, or is that a tad on the humorous side? I wonder if the 'good people' of TBN are aware of who Pasolini was, or even slightly familiar with any of his other works.

But don't get me wrong, I also agree with your sentiment that he is entirely admirable outside the perhaps 'lurid content' of his work. He is -above all else- a poet. Sometimes I don't entirely register the horror when watching Salo and just absorb the lyricism.
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#11 Godard Fan 39

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 04:08 PM

I recently saw that Gospel According to St Matthew was playing on TBN! Is it just me, or is that a tad on the humorous side? I wonder if the 'good people' of TBN are aware of who Pasolini was, or even slightly familiar with any of his other works.

But don't get me wrong, I also agree with your sentiment that he is entirely admirable outside the perhaps 'lurid content' of his work. He is -above all else- a poet. Sometimes I don't entirely register the horror when watching Salo and just absorb the lyricism.


I'm guessing TBN just figured its base would not look into it. Then again, I'm pretty confused about Pasolini, too, and I've seen basically all his works (minus Medea and some shorts). From what I gather, he himself was somewhat confused as to who he was (Catholic/atheist? gay/straight?). Most people refer to him as a Marxist atheist, but I remember on I believe it was the documentary on all the Waterbearer discs one of Pasolini's friends said that he was definitely a Catholic. Then again, I've seen Bresson called a Catholic atheist. So, in short, it's all very confusing.

He's the only director whose work I refer to as poetic. Of course, I haven't seen everything, but still. His movies definitely feature strong content; the end of Canterbury Tales, all the male nudity in Arabian Nights, Salo and, I don't know, the poop-eating. The quality of his work (well, at least outside Canterbury Tales!) always overwhelms any potentially disturbing material for me.
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#12 Godard Fan 39

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 04:10 PM

And to finish off my interrupted post from before, Arabian Nights' storytelling is just too much fun-one story within another, within another, within another...I remember reading on some British review site that one interesting thing about Arabian Nights is the contrast between the horrible events of the movie, namely all the crucifixions, beheadings, etc., and the almost constant smiling and laughing of its characters. This combination of some of the joys and pains of life makes it the perfect ending to the Trilogy of Life.
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#13 Godard Fan 39

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 03:51 PM

Just saw Pasolini's Medea over the weekend. It's another very enjoyable Pasolini movie. I just recommend that anybody who sees this first read the play it's based on, as well as the Argnonautica by Apollonius Rhodes, or else you'll be quite lost.
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