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Top Ten Films from Each Decade


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#41 hal0000

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 05:57 PM

I made a top 50 of the '40s because I felt like it. Yeah, about 90% is American, but it does tell me I need to see more international 1940s movies [that I like]:

First 17 are top-tiers (favorites) and pretty well ranked, kind of.

1. High Sierra --- A well-regarded classic, yet I still feel it gets overshadowed by its 1941 brethren.
2. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre --- I think this was the very first movie I saw on TCM.
3. A Canterbury Tale
4. The Hard Way --- I believe this is regarded as one of Ida Lupino's best performances (I agree) and I really hope it gets a proper DVD release instead of wallowing in the Warner Archive.
5. My Darling Clementine
6. A Letter to Three Wives --- Linda Darnell's a great actress. I don't think she was terribly versatile, but she had this very worldly, disillusioned persona that felt very organic.
7. Ball of Fire --- It's like character actor heaven. With Barbara Stanwyck's legs.
8. Unfaithfully Yours --- My favorite Sturges by far. He really lets Harrison run the gamut, swinging his emotional responses from vicious morbidity to flamboyant chivalry to some sort of old-fashioned, "gentlemanly" martyrdom. The dream sequences are tightly paced and it kind of unravels in the second half, but that's part of the charm.
9. City for Conquest --- I've never seen James Cagney or Anne Sheridan in roles this moving. It's a total tearjerker, but the characters are so earthy and believable you can't help but care for them.
10. Force of Evil --- I need to see Body and Soul. I say that because I consider John Garfield one of my favorite actors even though I've only seen a small handful of his work.
11. Black Narcissus --- Goddamn that scared the shit out of me. You know what I'm talking about.
12. Out of the Past
13. Scarlet Street --- For whatever reason, I'm not really a Lang worshiper. He's made a lot of movies I love, but this is the only one I'm really fond of. That's kind of a bullshit explanation so maybe a retrospective is in order.
14. Sullivan's Travels
15. Heaven Can Wait
16. Citizen Kane
17. The Red Shoes


(n-1)
17. Strange Impersonation --- I'm really starting to champion this thing more and more. Think Eyes without a Face meets The Woman in the Window.
18. Kind Hearts and Coronets
19. Beauty and the Beast
20. Paisan
21. Nightmare Alley --- I've seen a LOT of Tyrone Power at this point and to be honest, most of the movies he's in are total, or near total, garbage. This one, however, shows he was more than a good-looking face.
22. Fallen Angel
23. The Fallen Idol
24. Hangover Square --- This thing's got atmosphere. Like Strange Impersonation, it's an atypical noir dripping with pessimism.
25. They Drive by Night --- It has 4 of my favorite actors. Lupino is a classic femme fatale. I still think her work in The Hard Way beats it out, but this is certainly an intense performance.
26. Monsieur Verdoux
27. Leave Her to Heaven
28. Mark of Zorro --- Tyrone Power's one of my favorite actors. That's weird because I detest a lot of his movies. Nightmare Alley shows his range. Zorro shows how to properly capitalize on his persona. It's also got Linda Darnell which automatically gives bonus points.
29. Act of Violence --- Uh, it has Van Heflin and Robert Ryan. I really think this is one of those quintessential noirs dealing directly with the post-war environment.
30. Gaslight --- I haven't seen this in ages. Ingrid Bergman's great (of course) but Charles Boyer's got this really intense presence, like you're scared of what he'll say next.
31. Hail the Conquering Hero --- Makes me smile just thinking about it.
32. Lady Eve --- I need to see this again.
33. Postman Always Rings Twice --- I'm probably in the minority, but I prefer this to its older sibling, Double Indemnity.
34. Border Incident
35. Palm Beach Story
36. Desperate
37. No Time for Love
38. The Grapes of Wrath
39. Notorious --- Claude Rains is the most likeable person in this. I like that.
40. To Be or Not To Be
41. Kiss of Death
42. Woman in the Window
43. Double Indemnity
44. The Third Man
45. I Walked with a Zombie
46. Shop Around the Corner
47. 49th Parallel
48. Raw Deal
49. The Road House
50. Small Back Room

#42 clydefro

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 10:22 PM

Not to be curt, but did you want feedback hal or did you just want to share your favorites? If the latter, I'd probably wonder about the omissions of Ozu, Kurosawa, Dreyer, and more Wilder, Hawks and Preminger.

The Razor's Edge is pretty good Power. I like Grant's Devlin in Notorious. It's perhaps his most human character in the imperfections.

#43 hal0000

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 10:53 AM

Feedback's always welcome. It's really just to show where I'm deficient. I've only seen Late Spring from Ozu this decade which I feel I need to see again before I can make a judgment on it*. As far as Kurosawa, I've seen all the movies in both Eclipse sets and the only one I really like is One Wonderful Sunday. Still need to see Stray Dog and Drunken Angel and it's very likely these would appeal to me more than anything else from him this decade. Always interested in more Preminger; I've only got to Whirlpool, Fallen Angel, and Laura. The Big Sleep could probably be on here; I've seen it several times but I always seem to forget how I felt about it. I don't remember Red River too well** and I'm kind of hesitant to see it again on MGM's disc (which still hasn't got an upgrade I see). Dreyer's actually a near complete blind spot for me. Will definitely add that box set to my wishlist. I've only seen Double Indemnity and The Major and the Minor from Wilder. I liked The Major and the Minor, but I still don't think it holds a candle to what Sturges put out this decade.

* I've hit an Ozu mental block, so I don't know if I'll be getting to it anytime soon. I've watched the beginning of Tokyo Twilight 5 times and still can't finish it. Don't really know what's wrong with me.
**I do remember John Wayne being kind of an ass, which is a plus.




I'm a bit flippant when I disparage a lot of Tyrone Power's work. I seem to remember you not being into them, but have you seen his movies from that swashbuckler set? The only half-way decent one for me anyway is Blood on the Sand. Those "epics" and period dramas from 40s-60s hollywood usually feel like a tedious slog and I'm often disappointed by them. And Razor's Edge has just been ordered ^_^ .

I still find Grant's wearing too much of a poker face for me to warm up to him. He does have to balance his stoic professionalism with his concern for Alicia, but I kind of think he's too good at being professional. Alex is just a total wreck by the end. He's a mama's boy that got used by the girl of his dreams. I guess that sort of character appeals to me.

#44 clydefro

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Posted 27 May 2012 - 09:13 PM

Power had either lousy luck or bad taste, probably the former, because he was, as I understand it, the biggest star at Fox for many years yet struggled to actually make good movies. That's why he's probably not as well remembered now as the other leading men of the era. But he was just as big and more popular than most of them. I couldn't ever get enthusiastic enough for the box sets so I only have Blood and Sand, which boasts a great cast. Haven't watched it yet. Nightmare Alley is a major work and his Zorro is pretty entertaining. (Later, there's also the supporting role in Witness for the Prosecution.) The Razor's Edge kind of stays with me. The character Power plays was someone I could personally relate to enormously. For a glossy studio product, it has an intriguing side which is at times quite cerebral and philosophical. It basically questions the perceived wisdom so often mandated by society, which I found to be especially brave. And it has that quality which tends to really stand out now when watching studio films - it's interesting.

I like Drunken Angel and I like Stray Dog a good bit more. Late Spring is a big fat masterpiece, intimidating for that reason but richer on multiple viewings and as you establish distance from each one. Dreyer has one of these in both the '40s (Day of Wrath) and the '50s (Ordet).

On Hawks, Red River is among my favorite westerns for a number of reasons and I think he uses Wayne better than he was used in any other single western film. He also did Sergeant York, which shouldn't be easily dismissed, this decade, as well as His Girl Friday, which might be my favorite Hawks picture. For Preminger, I think Daisy Kenyon has to be seen because it's the perfect distillation of what he so often brought to the party. It's adult and formally beautiful and keenly aware of itself.

#45 Lohengrin

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 03:11 PM

Has anyone else become intrepid enough to try a top ten films from each year? I'm working on that now

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#46 hal0000

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 08:46 PM

Power had either lousy luck or bad taste, probably the former, because he was, as I understand it, the biggest star at Fox for many years yet struggled to actually make good movies.


The problem I notice with a lot of Power is his characters aren't really given room to breath. They're too often a rightful heir exiled and overburdened with the need for revenge/redemption. Interestingly, the studios put him in roles that I think he was good at playing--namely, the outsider. Yet the studios often made him a simple-minded, self-righteous dunderhead instead of allowing him to be the charming and enigmatic outsider that he was clearly capable of portraying (Nightmare Alley). Love is News is another good Power, and while I really think it's Loretta Young's show, it at least showed he was a capable comedic actor. It's waaaay better than the Power/Tierney remake.

I couldn't ever get enthusiastic enough for the box sets so I only have Blood and Sand, which boasts a great cast. Haven't watched it yet


I want to rate it higher, but Rita Hayworth kind of ruins it, I think. I'm not sure how good of an actress she is*, but she's awful in what's otherwise a very good, [mostly] well-written melodrama. It has one of Linda Darnell's more heart-wrenching performances.

I just saw Razor's Edge. At first, I thought Power was going to be another idealistic numbskull and while he's certainly written that way, now I'm not so sure. He plays his cards close to the chest; he's outwardly the enlightened man, yet he doesn't wear his emotions on his sleeve; we're kind of left to guess at his true feelings and motives and there is no simple agenda guiding him. It's a fascinating performance and arguably one of his most complex roles. And good lord, Gene Tierney's brilliant in this--so self-centered and even vicious at times, I wonder whether she's even conscious of what she's doing.
Spoiler
Yet, the movie accomplishes this without sacrificing her humanity. AND Anne Baxter! Man, she'll wreck your heart. All in all, it's a gem that manages to sidestep a lot of the problems I have with Power's studio vehicle pictures.

*I've only seen Blood and Sand, Lady from Shanghai, You'll Never be Rich, and You Were Never Lovelier. Haven't seen Gilda, which I know is like noir-blasphemy.







For the 50s list, the only new movies I've seen are All That Heaven Allows, Magnificent Obsession, and Good Morning. Douglas Sirk is pretty consistent for me, but his movies can be a bit heavy. I'm not fond of food analogies, but they're comparable to a cake that's too rich. I liked both of these, but the only Sirks I'm really considering are All That I Desire and There's Always Tomorrow.

Good Morning was a joy and I'll need to find space for it; what a good decision to stop beating my head against Tokyo Twilight to break out of my silly Ozu rut.

#47 clydefro

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 11:44 PM

^ Worth noting that Edmund Goulding directed both Nightmare Alley and The Razor's Edge and I don't believe he worked with Power on any other pictures.

#48 hal0000

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 02:10 PM

Nightmare Alley's still my favorite of the three I've seen from him. Is there any other Goulding I should check out? I've only seen Grand Hotel which is probably the only Garbo picture I actually like (although I've only seen the stuff from Warner's box).

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 04:05 PM

Those are actually the only three I've seen as well. I have a few of his Bette Davis pictures on DVD and Mister 880 is one I've wanted to see for the longest time.

#50 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 04:39 PM

Nightmare Alley's still my favorite of the three I've seen from him. Is there any other Goulding I should check out? I've only seen Grand Hotel which is probably the only Garbo picture I actually like (although I've only seen the stuff from Warner's box).


Those are actually the only three I've seen as well. I have a few of his Bette Davis pictures on DVD and Mister 880 is one I've wanted to see for the longest time.


While I still need to see several of Goulding's credited directed films you have mentioned (Nightmare Alley and The Razor's Edge), my current favorite is the 1938 The Dawn Patrol. With three actors I quite like in David Niven, Errol Flynn and Basil Rathbone, plus the plane action made it quite a fun watch for me.

I watched Hell's Angels the other night and apparently both him and James Whale directed several of the scenes in the film (not sure of the extent of both; I've read conflicting essays). I easily prefer The Dawn Patrol over this though for WWI flyer films.

While I have several more Garbo films to watch, my current favorite is Ninotchka.
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1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

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#51 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:05 PM

I thought I would have fun with this for the decade of the 20s. It is in order. Now mind you I'm a huge Buster Keaton fan and silent comedy in general (so all the shorts mentioned below I have seen several or more times). What is funny is that out of all the years the least movies (including shorts) I have seen belong to 1929. I spent too long on this. The reason for the repeating of years is that I use these on a variety of lists that are not necessarily year bound (like my top 300 etc...).

1920
Neighbors (1920: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton)
One Week (1920: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton)
Haunted Spooks (1920: Alfred J.Goulding, Hal Roach)
The Penalty (1920: Wallace Worsley)
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920: Robert Wiene)
The Mark of Zorro (1920: Fred Niblo)
The Scarecrow (1920: Buster Keaton/Edward Cline)
Convict 13 (1920: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton)
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920: John S. Robertson)
The Golem (1920: Carl Boese, Paul Wegener)

1921
The Play House (1921: Buster Keaton)
The Phantom Carriage (1921: Victor Sjostrom)
The Haunted House (1921: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton)
The Goat (1921: Buster Keaton, Malcolm St. Clair)
The Three Musketeers (1921: Fred Niblo)
The Kid (1921: Charlie Chaplin)
The Boat (1921: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton)
Orphans of the Storm (1921: D.W. Griffith)
Ace of Hearts (1921: Wallace Worsley)
The Sheik (1921: George Melford)

1922
Nosferatu (1922: F.W. Murnau)
The Electric House (1922: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton)
Cops (1922: Buster Keaton, Edward F. Cline)
Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler (1922: Fritz Lang)
Grandma’s Boy (1922: Fred C. Newmeyer)
The Paleface (1922: Buster Keaton)
The Blacksmith (1922: Buster Keaton, Malcolm St. Clair)
Haxan (1922: Benjamin Christensen)
Nanook of the North (1922: Robert J. Flaherty)
Robin Hood (1922: Allan Dwan)

1923
Safety Last (1923: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor)
Our Hospitality (1923: John G. Blystone, Buster Keaton)
Three Ages (1923: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton)
Why Worry? (1923: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor)
The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923: Wallace Worsley)
The Pilgrim (1923: Charlie Chaplin)
The Love Nest (1923: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton)
The Balloonatic (1923: Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton)
A Woman of Paris: A Drama of Fate (1923: Charlie Chaplin)
The Ten Commandments (1923: Cecil B.Demille)

1924
Sherlock Jr. (1924: Buster Keaton
Thief of Bagdad (1924: Raoul Walsh)
The Navigator (1924: Buster Keaton, Donald Crisp)
The Last Laugh (1924: F.W. Murnau)
Die Nibelungen (1924: Fritz Lang) (counting two films as one)
The Iron Horse (1924: John Ford)
Girl Shy (1924: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor)
The Three Waxworks (1924: Leo Birinsky, Paul Leni)
Entre’Acte (1924: Rene Clair)
The Hands of Orlac (1924: Robert Wiene)

1925
The Freshman (1925: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor)
The Gold Rush (1925: Charles Chaplin)
Seven Chances (1925: Buster Keaton)
Battleship Potemkin (1925: Sergei M. Eisenstein)
Ben Hur (1925: Fred Niblo)
The Phantom of the Opera (1925: Rupert Julian)
Grass - A Nation's Battle for Life (1925: Ernest B. Schoedsack, Merian C. Cooper)
Navy Blue Days (1925: Scott Pembroke, Joe Rock)
Go West (1925: Buster Keaton)
Tartuffe (1925: F.W. Murnau)

1926
The General (1926: Buster Keaton)
The Black Pirate (1926: Albert Parker)
Mighty Like a Mouse (1926: Leo McCarey)
Flesh and the Devil (1926: Clarence Brown)
The Temptress (1926: Fred Niblo)
The Strong Man (1926: Frank Capra)
Faust (1926: F.W. Murnau)
The Son of the Sheik (1926: George Fitzmaurice)
3 Bad Men (1926: John Ford)
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp (1926: Harry Edwards)

1927
Metropolis (1927: Fritz Lang)
Sunrise (1927: F.W. Murnau)
The Unknown (1927: Tod Browning)
The Cat and the Canary (1927: Paul Leni)
College (1927: James W. Horne, Buster Keaton)
The Lodger (1927: Alfred Hitchcock)
Underworld (1927: Josef von Sternberg)
The End of St. Petersberg (1927: Vsevolod Pudovkin, Mikhail Doller)
The Kid Brother (1927: Ted Wilde, J.A.Howe)
Wings (1927: William Wellman)

1928
The Last Command (1928: Josef von Sternberg)
The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928: Carl Dreyer)
Steamboat Bill Jr. (1928: Charles Reisner, Buster Keaton)
The Cameraman (1928: Edward Sedgwick)
Speedy (1928: Ted Wilde)
The Man Who Laughs (1928: Paul Leni)
The Circus (1928: Charlie Chaplin)
Spies (1928: Fritz Lang)
The Docks of New York (1928: Josef von Sternberg)
Four Sons (1928: John Ford)

1929
Un Chien Andalou (1929: Luis Bunuel)
Hallelujah! (1929: King Vidor)
Pandora’s Box (1929: Georg Wilhelm Pabst)
They Go Boom! (1929: James Parrott)
Man with the Movie Camera (1929: Dziga Vertov)
The Cocoanuts (1929: Robert Florey, Joseph Santley)
Perfect Day (1929: James Parrott)
Spite Marrige (Edward Sedgwick)
The Love Parade (1929: Ernst Lubitsch)
The Manxman (1929: Alfred Hitchcock)
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Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

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