Jump to content


Photo

Fuller, Samuel


  • Please log in to reply
61 replies to this topic

#21 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 May 2010 - 12:12 AM

Thanks Duke. You've really left me with little choice. I'm sadly influenced by shiny things so I'll wait until the Warner Archive cover is made available and then I'll probably look into getting the French release. I also need to figure out if there are any other French discs that I can't do without.

#22 Duke Togo

Duke Togo

    Evil mind, evil sword.

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,903 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 May 2010 - 12:29 AM

I recommend the French Los Olvidados, Thief of Paris, and Minnie and Moskowitz, all are English-friendly.

#23 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 May 2010 - 08:33 AM

Thief of Paris (Le Voleur) looks to be out of print? They do have Malle's Vie privee (A Very Private Affair) but it doesn't indicate English subtitles. The other two I've already recorded from television showings.

#24 Izo

Izo

    The Piano Has Been Drinking, Not Me

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,150 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 27 May 2010 - 09:04 AM

With the release of Verboten!, what Fuller films are left unavailable or OOP on region 1?

#25 Duke Togo

Duke Togo

    Evil mind, evil sword.

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,903 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 May 2010 - 09:57 AM

Thief of Paris (Le Voleur) looks to be out of print? They do have Malle's Vie privee (A Very Private Affair) but it doesn't indicate English subtitles. The other two I've already recorded from television showings.

I actually have the Spanish one found here, the Dutch one is found here, and then here is what looks like the Hungarian version. I remember seeing a French one with a similar cover to these back when I bought it, but now I cannot find it.

With the release of Verboten!, what Fuller films are left unavailable or OOP on region 1?

We still need:
Park Row (1952)
China Gate (1957)
Run of the Arrow (1957)
Thieves After Dark (1984)


As an interesting Fuller oddity, check out Tigrero: A Film That Was Never Made (1994), staring Sam Fuller and Jim Jarmusch. Here they visit a Brazilian native village decades after Sam had taken footage to show the executives for a film idea he had. The film, titled Tigrero, fell through at the studio, but Sam never let the idea go to make a film around these people he had grown to respect so much. There is some oddly scripted Jarmusch-styled dialogue, but there is also some real magic going on as Sam shows the natives the footage of their village and the villagers start to recognize themselves or relatives. That was a special moment for Sam. The film really honors Sam and his career, which is a bit more important to me than the film being good.

Here is a clip:


#26 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 May 2010 - 11:47 AM

Though I can't even find it on IMDb for some reason, Fuller's Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street isn't available to my knowledge. Fantoma was going to release it in R1 years ago but I don't think the disc ever actually came out.

Run of the Arrow popped up on TCM a week or two ago.

#27 Izo

Izo

    The Piano Has Been Drinking, Not Me

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,150 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 03 September 2010 - 03:58 PM

Shockproof

This is a Sam Fuller oddity, as he scripted it but didn't direct. Those duties went to melodrama master Douglas Sirk. The film is fascinating when viewed as a collision of two completely different styles, and it's quite good as a pulpy noir, as well. Fans of both directors will find touches of them in the film - I smiled when I learned the male lead's character's name was Griff - even if it doesn't always come together gracefully. The script is terse and pulpy, about a murderess who's made parole and the parole officer who stupidly falls in love with her, and it has the kind of dialogue that only Fuller could write. The ending completely pulls the rug out from under the film in the worst way possible by undermining everything that has come before. IMDB claims that Sirk signed on to make the film based on the strength of Fuller's script, but the ending was changed by producers into the cop-out that remains. Still, there's a lot to like here, and fans of either director will enjoy this.

#28 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 04 September 2010 - 05:56 AM

I know I already linked to my review of the set with Shockproof in it, but (just as another take on it) here's the relevant portion about the film:

Fuller and Columbia at least found a better director for Shockproof, the 1949 film noir that became his first postwar script to go before the cameras. Auteurists' collective heads might explode at the idea of Douglas Sirk making a Sam Fuller story. On the surface, the two men made wildly different movies, but their interests were probably not terribly dissimilar. In just a few more years, Sirk would become unparalleled at transforming glossy melodrama into masterpiece-level depictions of a crumbling American facade obsessed with all that glitters in the superficial deception of the 1950s. Fuller, of course, embraced conflict and internal destruction across his career. When Shockproof was made, Sirk was still establishing himself in Hollywood. It would be five more years before the breakout success of Magnificent Obsession signaled a major re-imagining of the American dream.

Shockproof, though it has its fans, is perhaps a less than ideal merging of the sensibilities of Sirk and Fuller, with some degree of tinkering by credited co-writer Helen Deutsch (a capable scribe on much different, more female-oriented pictures like National Velvet, Lili, I'll Cry Tomorrow, and Valley of the Dolls). The filmmaking itself is exquisitely proficient. Sirk's usual interest in a sort of forbidden romance is represented by Cornel Wilde's probation officer Griff Marat and the ex-con Jenny Marsh, played by Patricia Knight. She's an effective, if passive, femme fatale who succumbs to Griff's persistence rather than showing herself as the usual female open to ideas of rescue. Knight's performance is distressingly guarded. Is Jenny falling for Griff or is it all an elaborate ploy designed by her gangster boyfriend Harry Wesson (John Baragrey)? This cuts both ways. Her lack of clear direction plays tricks with our heads while withholding whether she even prefers one man over the other. We don't trust her yet we can't dismiss her either. It's a strange example of what is basically a performance lacking in any real distinction but nonetheless effective as a blank canvas beholden to the plot. Confused yet?

Two things about Shockproof really bother me, to the point where I struggle to enjoy it. Foremost is Cornel Wilde, who must be the unlikeliest noir hero to have put his footprints in a small handful of the style's more noteworthy entries. (See The Big Combo and Leave Her to Heaven but don't expect Wilde to dazzle or do much beyond suck the angst from his characters.) He's such a bland actor whose line deliveries always lack emotion. Wilde in Shockproof is supposed to be a good guy parole officer with political aspirations. This part, the uninteresting strive for nominal professional success, is believable. Problem is, it destroys the big turn taken by the film, where Wilde's character chooses to give up everything for Jenny. No way would a guy like this join a lovers on the run caravan. Ambitious individuals simply don't sacrifice themselves especially for a frigid dame like her. I can't accept the direction Shockproof takes, but those who apparently can might also accept the absurd ending apparently concocted by Deutsch and regretted by Fuller and Sirk. The far more fitting idea of Griff being punished for his decision to cling to the no-good Jenny would have at least acted as the usual noir cautionary tale against conniving women. We're instead left with something grotesque in its own right. Sympathy is a mean beast. Sirk pretends to like the characters while Fuller surely would have preferred a comeuppance. No fatalism, no compromise.

#29 Izo

Izo

    The Piano Has Been Drinking, Not Me

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,150 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:37 PM

It Happened in Hollywood

I hesitate to even post a capsule review in this thread, as Fuller is only a third-billed writer on this very minor film, but as it's in that Sam Fuller box that came out a few years ago, why not? You have to look very hard for traits that one would deem "Fullerian" in this movie, but there are a few, even if I'm imagining it. For example, one can't help but smile at the spineless depiction of studio execs. The lead actor's "Aw shucks" performance really makes it hard to take most of the film serious on an emotional or intellectual level, but at the same time I kind of enjoyed it. If you just go along with it and don't scrutinize it too closely, it's really not all that bad of a way to spend an hour. It's hardly a major film, and no one is really missing much by not seeing it, but fans of Sam Fuller I think will find it interesting.

#30 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 23 January 2011 - 02:26 AM

China Gate is on Netflix streaming but in 1.33:1 rather than Scope as it should be. I can't bear that.

I did see Street of No Return a few weeks ago and thought it was even better than not half bad. I'd like to find a full-fledged appreciation or defense of the film since even the kindest comments seem to consider it just mediocre. What I loved was the heavily stylized approach. I think it's appropriate for a Fuller-directed adaptation of a David Goodis book that was made in the '80s. That creates several big, capital letters influences. It's tough in its own way, though not in the same way as some of Fuller's other work. To me, most importantly, it feels almost exactly like how Fuller logically would update his style for the time. The dubbing that came as a result of actors speaking multiple languages on set is unfortunate, but a byproduct of it being an international production. Maybe in another decade or two this will have its reputation rehabilitated a little.

#31 Izo

Izo

    The Piano Has Been Drinking, Not Me

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,150 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 26 January 2011 - 03:25 PM

Another non-directorial work from Fuller from the Sony box set, Adventure in Sahara is twice as good as you expect it to be. It's also surprisingly very brutal for such an obscure film of its time. You'd think that the violence alone would get it some sort of recognition, but apparently not. In any case, it's for the most part a very tense, harrowing film. If the ending doesn't work, it's not too consequential for a 55-minute long B-movie, and the rest of the picture is entertaining enough to warrant a recommendation, especially for Fuller fans who can, in a way, view it as a kind of dry run for Underworld U.S.A., Fuller's revenge masterpiece that perplexingly isn't on every top 100 list.

#32 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 April 2011 - 09:15 PM

It would seem that Park Row is coming via DVD-R in the MGM Classics line.

#33 Izo

Izo

    The Piano Has Been Drinking, Not Me

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,150 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 18 April 2011 - 09:51 PM

Unfortunate, but at least I'll finally get to see it.

#34 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 June 2011 - 03:39 PM

Unbelievable! Sam Fuller screentested for The Godfather Part II and there's now video of it. It was for the Hyman Roth part that eventually went to Lee Strasberg.

#35 masterofoneinchpunch

masterofoneinchpunch

    The Artful Dodger

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,371 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Modesto, CA
  • Interests:NBA, MMA, Movies, Setting fires.

Posted 03 June 2011 - 04:09 PM

Unbelievable! Sam Fuller screentested for The Godfather Part II and there's now video of it. It was for the Hyman Roth part that eventually went to Lee Strasberg.


Great find clyde. What did you think of his read through?
Under Construction:
My Criterion Collection (408; I Own and Have Watched):
1-16, 18, 19, 20, 21(2nd), 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51(1st & 2nd), 52, 52, 53, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88, 90, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 143, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151(1st), 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 164, 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 226, 227, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 260, 263, 266, 267, 268, 271, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 297, 298, 300(2D), 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 335, 336, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 359, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 378, 379, 380, 383, 385, 386, 387, 388, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 404, 405, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 437, 439, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 451, 453, 455, 456, 457, 459, 460, 461, 462, 465, 470, 475, 476, 478, 481, 482, 487, 490, 497, 498, 499, 500, 501, 503, 505, 512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530, 531, 539, 540, 543, 556, 565, 572, 578, 579, 580, 586, 596, 650, 664, 677

Previous Editions: 2,
Eclipse: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 23, 26, 33

“Empty your bladder of that bitter black urine you call coffee.” – The Tick

My HK movie reviews
My Amazon Reviews

#36 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 June 2011 - 04:29 PM

It mostly seemed like Sam being Sam rather than embodying Hyman Roth (or at least the Roth as we know him in the film by way of Strasberg's performance). The video is more fascinating in a "worlds collide!" way than anything else.

#37 Izo

Izo

    The Piano Has Been Drinking, Not Me

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,150 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 29 June 2011 - 08:37 PM

Verboten!

A fantastic Sam Fuller film, and an easy recommendation for fans of the director. The film has what I think may be Fuller's most cynical, ironic, brilliant opening ever. The first thing we hear after (or over) the RKO title is the all-to-familiar duh-duh-duh-DUN or Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, followed by a machine gun mimicking the rhythm and a short exchange between two soldiers. After a dolly up to the sign ("VERBOTEN!") that serves as the film's title card, we hear a cornball Paul Anka-sung title tune ("Our love is verboten....", he croons in the height of his teen idol stardom) over images of WWII devastation and death. The disconnect between the image and the song is Fuller at his unsubtle, punch-in-the-gut best. The opening isn't the last we'll hear of Beethoven, either. The film uses his most familiar music, and that of Wagner - "Flight of the Valkyries" gets a particularly memorable montage - to great effect, which is bizarre because these sorts of "greatest hits" musical choices often come off as cliched and lazy. This is visually some of the best work Sam Fuller's done, as well, particularly with the art direction. Fuller consistently fills his backgrounds with swastikas, battle scene paintings, and picket signs ("Democracy on an Empty Stomach. Yanks Go Home!"), which makes for a very busy look for the movie. Also, look for numerous references to the Big Red One unit. This is Samuel Fuller heaven, guys, and you should really see it. The film features a lot of grainy stock footage in various stages of ruination, and I always think it's strange when two characters of a different country (in this case German) speak English when there are no English-speaking characters around. These are minor complaints though, and they're really the only ones I've been able to come up with. I loved it.

#38 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 July 2011 - 07:27 PM

^ I didn't like it quite as much as you Izo. The actors/performances seemed weak. The use of classical music is definitely inspired but the film otherwise felt incredibly heavyhanded, even for Fuller.

#39 Izo

Izo

    The Piano Has Been Drinking, Not Me

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,150 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 04 July 2011 - 03:35 PM

Really? I'm really surprised. I do agree, I suppose, that the performances are pretty weak, but I've always considered this a common thread throughout Fuller's films (with obvious notable exceptions: Lee Marvin, Widmark, Stanwyck), so perhaps it's something I overlook quickly.

Looking back, the movie is very heavyhanded, especially all the stuff with the Fraulein's brother. My initial enthusiasm was overdone, I suppose, though I stand by it. It's not quite top-tier Fuller, but I think it is damn close.

Also: for a "remastered" release the movie looked more or less like all the other Warner Archive films I've seen.

#40 clydefro

clydefro

    waiting for the click

  • MOC Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 04 July 2011 - 05:06 PM

Don't let my reservations dampen your enthusiasm, especially for a Fuller film. I've seen almost all of his movies now, and Verboten! just felt, to use a dreaded word, minor to me.

Though Fuller sometimes had lesser known actors (like Constance Towers or Gene Evans, among several others), usually the performances are at least consistent with Fuller's boldness, which I love.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users