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Romero, George A.


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#1 Izo

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 03:47 PM

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With certain directors and in certain genres the biggest hurdle to cross, the biggest annoyance to look past, is their fans. This is true with a director like Quentin Tarantino, whose ardent fanboys are the only people on Earth that can talk more and faster than QT himself. It's also true for George A. Romero, who is certainly among the greatest specialists in horror films that has ever lived. For an American, you'd have to go back to Tod Browning to find an equal. Unfortunately, even the proponents of Romero's cinema rarely look past his zombie films to see the richness of his work - exclusively in horror with two exceptions - and the true brilliance of his art.

Indeed, I love each of the Living Dead pictures that Romero has made (I have not yet seen Survival of the Dead), and each for different reasons. Night of the Living Dead (1968) is an undeniable classic that every film lover at some point sees. It would set the stage for the rest of Romero's career, as in the film you will find all of the trademarks from his future pictures. A healthy dose of social commentary, brutally realistic human relationships, news and radio reports, and human stupidity and selfishness bringing forth the downfall of nearly every character. Dawn of the Dead (1978) is a film that I find overrated, but it too is a genre classic. As far as I'm concerned, if Romero could have simply cut out the final act of the film it would be nearly perfect. Day of the Dead (1985), is my personal favorite of the series. It's a nasty, cynical movie without a shred of legitimate hope throughout, and until the final fifteen or twenty minutes of the film, there are virtually no zombie-deaths. Add to this a truly brilliant performance by Howard Sherman as Bub, a zombie that is slowly learning, and you have what I consider a masterpiece. Land of the Dead came about twenty years later, and I am one of the few defenders of that film, even among Romero's fans. In no other film has Romero been able to so deftly combine his biting social commentary with the story that he must tell to satisfy his producers and fans. Roger Ebert posed a question about this film:

"The most intriguing single shot in "Land of the Dead" is a commercial for Fiddler's Green, showing tanned and smiling residents, dressed in elegant leisurewear, living the good life. They look like the white-haired eternally youthful golfers in ads for retirement paradises. Why does Fiddler's Green need to advertise, when it is full and people are literally dying to get in?"

The answer to this question points to the reason why I feel the film is so good: Romero cuts to the core of human cruelty and stupidity. The answer, of course, is that the people who are lucky and wealthy enough to live on Fiddler's Green are not satisfied with having everything unless the lower classes know that they have nothing. Diary of the Dead, which Romero has said sits apart from his other zombie films, tells its story through the camera of group of young film students. Again, I am among the few who find the film worthwhile - I'd even go so far as calling it one of Romero's best.

Look past the zombie movies, though, and you'll find a treasure trove of intelligent horror films and one unjustly near-forgotten bizarro gem of a movie. I'm referring to Knightrider, Romero's brilliant and sensitive retelling of the Camelot myth set in a modern day Renaissance festival where motorcycles serve as horses. As ridiculous as all of this sounds, the film is brilliant and moving. Martin belongs in the category of greatest vampire films ever made, and it may not even have an actual vampire in it. Creepshow is a great throwback to the drive-in movies and horror comic books of Romero's youth, and it's every bit as entertaining as you'd hope. Bruiser is another underrated gem, far from perfect, that works as a truly depressing character study of a man who feels (and who may actually be) pretty worthless. The Crazies (1973) is a Vietnam war film masquerading as a horror film, and it's almost certainly the inspiration for the recent wave of "running zombies" that we see in movies such as 28 Days Later and the Dawn of the Dead remake. If more attention were given to these wonderful movies, more would see just what a resourceful, intelligent director George Romero is.

Forum Topics:

Dawn of the Dead '78 - Good MOVIE, or Good HORROR Movie?

Web Resources:

There's No Magic: A Conversation With George Romero

Senses of Cinema: Great Director

Chris Fujiwara on Land of the Dead

Sight & Sound: Romero's Top Ten Films

#2 mikesncc1701

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 06:13 AM

I've also felt that Land and Diary were entirely underrated. One thing I love about all of them is you can tell that each one was made at a specific point in cinema and that in each time period, they contain some relevant message about society during that point. Whether it be racism in Night, or obsession with technology in Diary, I consider each film important to the genre and the franchise itself. I could order Survival on my PS3 but I'm just gonna wait to buy it so I can put it on the shelf with my others.

#3 Izo

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 07:44 PM

Romero's ten favorite films (for those who don't feel like clicking) are really fascinating:

1. The Brothers Karamazov (Brooks)
2. Casablanca (Curtiz)
3. Dr. Strangelove (Kubrick)
4. High Noon (Zinnemann)
5. King Solomon's Mines (Bennett)
6. North by Northwest (Hitchcock)
7. The Quiet Man (Ford)
8. Repulsion (Polanski)
9. Touch of Evil (Welles)
10. The Tales of Hoffmann (Powell, Pressburger)

Not only is there a noticeable lack of horror, but he stays pretty far away from the normal canon altogether. Things like The Quiet Man, and The Tales of Hoffmann stick out as really unusual, considering Romero's work. It has nothing to do with his films, I suppose, I just find it interesting.

Didn't Romero do an interview for the Tales of Hoffmann Criterion edition? I have it on DVD...but bought it off Amazon marketplace and it turned out to be a bootleg without features. It's a film I love, and I really need to remedy that, as I've watched it five or six times since I bought it. In any case, is it a decent interview?

Have you seen any of his his non-zombie films, Mikey?

#4 mikesncc1701

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 08:55 PM

Have you seen any of his his non-zombie films, Mikey?

I saw Monkey Shines YEARS ago. Man, I must have been like 8 and was up late at night. I don't remember jack from it though. I really need to get off my ass and see the original Crazies before I watch the remake. Martin sounds pretty interesting so I'm sure I'll check that out as well sometime in the future.

#5 masterofoneinchpunch

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 10:40 AM

Romero's ten favorite films (for those who don't feel like clicking) are really fascinating:

1. The Brothers Karamazov (Brooks)
2. Casablanca (Curtiz)
3. Dr. Strangelove (Kubrick)
4. High Noon (Zinnemann)
5. King Solomon's Mines (Bennett)
6. North by Northwest (Hitchcock)
7. The Quiet Man (Ford)
8. Repulsion (Polanski)
9. Touch of Evil (Welles)
10. The Tales of Hoffmann (Powell, Pressburger)

Not only is there a noticeable lack of horror, but he stays pretty far away from the normal canon altogether. Things like The Quiet Man, and The Tales of Hoffmann stick out as really unusual, considering Romero's work. It has nothing to do with his films, I suppose, I just find it interesting.

Didn't Romero do an interview for the Tales of Hoffmann Criterion edition? I have it on DVD...but bought it off Amazon marketplace and it turned out to be a bootleg without features. It's a film I love, and I really need to remedy that, as I've watched it five or six times since I bought it. In any case, is it a decent interview?
...


That's an interesting list. A few of those you can find on many canon's like Dr. Stranglove, Casablanca, North by Northwest, Repulsion, Touch of Evil, used to be more fans of High Noon, but I still haven't seen King Solomon's Mines or The Brothers Karamazov (I like Yul so I wouldn't mind seeing that).

Yes Tales of Hoffman has a New video interview with director George A. Romero. Easily worth watching and I know you would like it Izo. Boots suck (haven't heard of a Tales of Hoffman boot; can you take pics of it for this site Izo?) I'm not the biggest fan of that movie, it just didn't seem to connect to me.
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#6 Izo

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 03:24 PM

That's an interesting list. A few of those you can find on many canon's like Dr. Stranglove, Casablanca, North by Northwest, Repulsion, Touch of Evil, used to be more fans of High Noon, but I still haven't seen King Solomon's Mines or The Brothers Karamazov (I like Yul so I wouldn't mind seeing that).

Yes Tales of Hoffman has a New video interview with director George A. Romero. Easily worth watching and I know you would like it Izo. Boots suck (haven't heard of a Tales of Hoffman boot; can you take pics of it for this site Izo?) I'm not the biggest fan of that movie, it just didn't seem to connect to me.


It appears to be from Korea. I'll take pictures and put them up. It's the only bad experience I've ever had buying a used Criterion, but it's still a sore spot.

Mike: Monkey Shines is one of the only Romero films I haven't seen. I've heard good things, though. The Unseen Others are There's Always Vanilla (Romero hates it, and it's his only other non-horror), Season of the Witch, Two Evil Eyes (he directed one half, Dario Argento directed the other), and his latest, Survival of the Dead. I own Vanilla and Season, though. Anchor Bay put out a DVD with both of them. They aren't supposed to be very good so who knows when I'll get around to actually watching them.

I would really love for someone to watch Knightriders and tell me how much they hate or love it, though. It was on my 100 Blows list.

#7 Izo

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 05:58 PM

Drift from Criterions You Have Recently Purchased -Duke

Has anyone seen Walker? I've always been curious about that one.

I haven't, and I too am curious, mostly because it's a period piece coming from the same place as Sid & Nancy and Repo Man. Can't wait to see how Cox approaches it.

In the 80s Ed Harris was really doing some fascinating work. Have you seen George Romero's Knightriders?

#8 Duke Togo

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 06:01 PM

^
Nope, but that sounds ridiculous, and just damn interesting.

#9 Izo

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 06:03 PM

I actually think it may be my favorite Romero film. It is ridiculous, and really weird, but it's also completely sincere and strangely touching.

I may have to write something about that one. I think I even put it in my top 100.

#10 Duke Togo

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 06:06 PM

Oh wow:


I love Tom Savini cameos. :D

#11 Izo

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 06:10 PM

He actually has a fairly large part in the film. The movie is a retelling of the Camelot myth (more or less), and he plays the Lancelot character.

#12 Duke Togo

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 06:15 PM

^
Not surprised since it's Romero. I would have to say my favorite of his was Monkey Shines.

#13 Izo

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 06:46 PM

I still have that one on the shelf unwatched.

You said you didn't care much for Bruiser, didn't you? I actually thought that that one was pretty great right up until the climax, which was just stupid (and way too Misfits-y for my taste).

#14 Izo

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 10:34 AM

Survival of the Dead has a pretty poor reputation both among critics and fans of George A. Romero's work, but I thought it was a very good entry into the series that continues exploring Romero's apocalyptic themes with relatively little overlap and repetition. Survival of the Dead most closely resembles, for long stretches of the movie, a western. The performances are generally very good, particularly from Kenneth Walsh, that veteran actor who I will always remember from Twin Peaks, playing one of the leaders of the two Irish families that control the island the film centers around. Indeed, the original rumored title for the film was "Island of the Dead", which is far more appropriate than "Survival". In any case, I'm not sure just why this film's got such a horrible reputation among Romero fans (critics don't surprise me, however), although the focus here is less on zombies and more on the human story, which boils down to being a very traditional western tale with two warring families, complete with climactic shootout. This is nothing new for Romero films, though. All of his Dead movies except for Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead have been poorly received with a fanbase coming afterwards. My favorite of the zombie films will probably always remain the nihilistic Day of the Dead, and my favorite character that Romero has ever created will probably remain that film's Bub. I especially loved the final shot of the picture.

#15 Duke Togo

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 07:48 PM

Ever since Land of the Dead I had pretty much written off Romero's Dead series as no longer worth following, but this honestly wasn't that bad. There were camp elements I wished would go away, especially in the case of the steady stream of creative zombie killings. I also found a lot of the CG pretty jarring (a little surprised there were no Tom Savini spottings).

In any case, this was far better than Land, and had some commendable themes and character motivations. The twin sister turned zombie roaming the country side on horseback was an eerie stroke of genius. Though, why do characters in the Dead films continue to trust the undead? They will always get bitten once they've let their guard down, and it will always feel rather stupid and unnecessary.

Loved that closing shot. :)

#16 Izo

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 09:53 AM

It reminded me, of all goddamn things, of Barry Lyndon. I'm thinking it may be the best shot that Romero's ever come up with.

See, the people continuing to trust the dead continue Romero's evolutionary themes because he keeps showing with each subsequent film the zombies evolving and "learning". In Night, the zombies are just a brainless mass, in Dawn, they return to the places they know. In Day, the Bub character learns simple commands and has a functioning memory. In Land, the zombies learn to use tools. And now, with Survival ("Island" would really have been so much better), we learn that they can be taught to eat alternate forms of meat. There's obviously a suspension of disbelief going on here, but I do think there's a very strong line leading the zombies to the point they are at now. On top of this, the human characters still cannot get past the fact that these are their friends and relatives their dealing with. It's only the traveling characters, the mercenaries, that can kill without hesitation.

What did you think of Diary of the Dead? I'm seriously in the minority, but I think it's the third-best dead film behind Day and Night.

#17 Izo

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 09:07 PM

I've just watched Romero's second film, There's Always Vanilla, which is an atrocious lighthearted hippie rom-com. If it's not Romero's absolute worst film, I'll be shocked. The thing is, the movie is so innocuous that I can't even muster up the energy to hate it. It just kind of...exists. I'll never sit through it again.

Edit: Immediately after this, I watched the equally atrocious Season of the Witch, a movie I don't even want to waste an extra post on. Pseudo-women's lib garbage. Just skip them both unless you're like me and really wanted to finish off Romero's filmography. I actually found There's Always Vanilla to be the superior film, and that's no saying much.

I will say this, though: Anchor Bay's release of the two films is almost worth checking out just for the extras. There's an hour-long doc on Romero, interviews, deleted scenes, and best of all a 16-minute interview with Romero himself, in which he basically disowns There's Always Vanilla and considers Season of the Witch a wasted opportunity for a good film, and the only one of his own films that he'd like to remake. He even says he has no desire to ever see the films again and that they were not pleasant experiences for him to make.

#18 Izo

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 01:00 AM

I've just watched Monkey Shines: An Experiment in Fear, and now I've seen all of George Romero's filmography. The film has too-much stuffed into it. At nearly two hours, it's at least thirty minutes too long* and there are too many unessential subplots cluttering up what would otherwise be a very good horror/suspense film. The film is very over-the-top, and it generally works in a sort of what-are-they-going-to-try-next sort of way, but the over-plottedness of the entire affair drags it down immeasurably.

Ebert nailed it:

"Just a shade of understatement would have gone a long way. It could have benefitted from losing a few subplots, especially the protective mother and the jealous university dean. That would have allowed the story to proceed more directly to its inevitable conclusion. Instead, Romero loses momentum in the closing passages because he has too many loose ends to keep track of. Somewhere within this movie's two hours or so is hidden an absolutely spellbinding 90-minute thriller."


*sometimes I feel like I have the attention span of a gnat, as I seem to say this all the time, but I stand by it. Films, especially horror and action films, have become needlessly bloated since the days of the double-feature.

#19 Vesten Pilsbreeg

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 06:39 PM

Two Evil Eyes (he directed one half, Dario Argento directed the other)


Have you seen this yet? I honestly much prefer Argento's telling of "The Black Cat" to Romero's "The Facts In The Case Of Mr. Valdemar", but that's not a criticism of Romero's segment so much as Argento's being just that good (the gore was outstanding and Keitel gave a wonderfully unhinged performance).

Two Evil Eyes, along with Creepshow and The Dark Half are also the only non-living-dead Romero films I've seen, sadly, all of which I loved to varying degrees, save for Survival, which, upon my single viewing, left me disappointed. I've been meaning to revisit it, though, to see if my initial reaction holds.

#20 Sam Sanchez

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 09:17 AM

Have you seen this yet? I honestly much prefer Argento's telling of "The Black Cat" to Romero's "The Facts In The Case Of Mr. Valdemar", but that's not a criticism of Romero's segment so much as Argento's being just that good (the gore was outstanding and Keitel gave a wonderfully unhinged performance).

Two Evil Eyes, along with Creepshow and The Dark Half are also the only non-living-dead Romero films I've seen, sadly, all of which I loved to varying degrees, save for Survival, which, upon my single viewing, left me disappointed. I've been meaning to revisit it, though, to see if my initial reaction holds.


I would strongly recommend checking out Martin as for non-living-dead Romero films. Also, a guilty pleasure of mine is Monkey Shines.

My Criterion Collection (696/699):
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, [66], 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, [86], 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, [124], 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, [167], 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, [179], 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, [185], 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, [203], 204, 205, 206, 207, [208], 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, [241], 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, [250], 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, [261], 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, [282], 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, [327], 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, [342], 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 363, [364], 365, 366, 367, 368, [369], 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, [392], 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, [418], 419, 420, 421, 422, 423, 424, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 436, 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 442, 443, 444, 445, 446, 447, 448, 449, 450, 451, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 457, 458, 459, 460, 461, 462, 463, 464, 465, 466, 467, 468, 469, 470, [471], 472, 473, 474, 475, 476, 477, 478, 479, 480, 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 486, 487, 488, 489, 490, 491, 492, 493, 494, 495, 496, 497, 498, 499, [500], 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, [508], 509, 510, 511, 512, 513, 515, 516, 517, [518], 519, 520, 521, 522, 523, [524], 525, 526, 527, [528], 529, 530, 531, 532, 533, 534, 535, 536, 537, 538, 539, 540, 541, 542, 543, 544, 545, 546, 547, 548, 549, 550, 551, 552, 553, 554, 555, 556, 557, 558, 559, 560, 561, 562, 563, 564, 565, 566, 567, 568, 569, 570, 571, 572, 573, 574, 575, 576, 577, 578, 579, 580, 581, 582, 583, 584, 585, 586, [587], 588, 589, 590, 591, 592, 593, 594, 595, 596, 597, 598, 599, 600, 601, 602, [603], 604, 605, 606, 607, 608, 609, 610, 611, 612, 613, 614, 615, 616, 617, 618, 619, 620, 621, 622, 623, 624, 625, 626, 627, 628, 629, 630, [631], 632, 633, 634, 635, 636, 637, 638, [639], 640, 641, 642, 643, 644, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, 650, 651, 652, 653, 654, 655, 656, 657, 658, 659, 660, 661, 662, 663, 664, 665, 666, 667, 668, 669, 670, 671, [672], 673, 674, 675, 676, 677, 678, 679, 680, 681, 682, 683, [684], 685, 686, 687, 688, 689, 690, 691, 692, 694, 695, 696, 700

 

 

RED = OOP Release

BLUE = BD Release
[ ] = Box Set

 

My BD/DVD Collection
My Letterboxd





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